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The height of the ice dam typically approached 610 metres (2,000 ft), flooding the valleys of western Montana approximately 320 kilometres (200 mi) eastward.Meet thousands of local Mc Call singles, as the worlds largest dating site we make dating in Mc Call easy!Plentyoffish is 100% Free, unlike paid dating sites.The Glacial Lake Missoula National Natural Landmark is located about 110 kilometres (68 mi) northwest of Missoula, Montana, at the north end of the Camas Prairie Valley, just east of Montana Highway 382 and Macfarlane Ranch.It was designated as a National Natural Landmark in 1966 because it contains the great ripples (often measuring 25 to 50 feet (7.6 to 15.2 m) high and 300 feet (91 m) long) that served as a strong supporting element for J Harlen Bretz's contention that Washington State's Channeled Scablands were formed by repeated cataclysmic floods over only about 2,000 years, rather than through the millions of years of erosion that had been previously assumed.